Nomad: Connected Dining

Situated in a reimagined furniture showroom, this rustic assemblage of brick, timber and concrete permeates a warmth and approachability matched only by the uncomplicated flair of its year-round menu.

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Nomad

Sydney, Australia


At the heart of Nomad is connection. Situated in a reimagined furniture showroom, this rustic assemblage of brick, timber and concrete permeates a warmth and approachability matched only by the uncomplicated flair of its year-round menu. Freshly baked breads and locally sourced charcuterie boards are ferried out of an open kitchen designed to enable “people to feel a sense of connection with the process.” Scrumptious share plates are accompanied by curated offerings from an Australian-focused cellar door (and now Wine Club) that boasts a diverse range of grapes, wine-making techniques and little-known producers. All aspects, Yazbeck tells us, culminate in an experience that is as memorable as it is enjoyable. “When I sit here and see people around me and they’re conversing and its families and first dates and 30th birthdays and anniversaries, I feel the real humanistic aspect of dining. And that’s what I love.”

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Where Foster St, Surry Hills NSW 2010
When Lunch, Wednesday to Saturday between noon and 2:30pm. Dinner, Monday to Saturday from 6pm till late
Cuisine Mediterranean
Best for rambunctious evening gatherings with families and friends garnished with free-flowing Australian wine and scrumptious share plates
Our recommendation One cannot go wrong with a cast-iron pan of Jersey milk haloumi dressed in wood-fired tomatoes. honey and sherry.

 



For centuries, mealtime has been understood not simply as a ritual of physical nourishment but also as a signifier of interpersonal closeness. We schedule meals with those we love not to secure sustenance but to develop and strengthen our relationships. In doing so, we elevate the importance of the food we eat and the dining establishments we frequent. Meals become both a catalyst for connection and a symbol of the affection we harbour. Moreover, the meals we share provide insight into the history, geography and culture of a chef or locale.

Introduction Chynna Lao
Images Nic Gossage
 

 

 
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According to Rebecca Yazbeck, co-owner of Surry Hills-based Nomad, the intimacy of eating with loved ones lies at the core of her passion for dining. She says, “you can have incredible food but if you’re not in the space and if you’re not with the right people, the wine is lacklustre. To me, what I’ve always loved about dining is that you’re with the people you love and it’s this intimate experience. Especially now that everything’s digital! You used to talk to people at the bus stop and now you go past and everyone’s just on their phones. So, when I sit here and see people around me and they’re conversing and its families and first dates and 30th birthdays and anniversaries, I feel the real humanistic aspect of dining. And that’s what I love.


"To just look at food as sustenance, you’re missing out on a whole plethora of experiences and connections with humans. When I travel, which I love, food to me is an insight into the geography of the place, the history of the place, the culture… it’s like, you can go to a French farmer’s market and speak little French, but you can have an absolute conversation because of the produce. “What are you going to cook?” “This is the best kind of meat for that.” “You should have this wine with that, go to my friend’s bottle shop…” That’s beautiful. That’s community.”


 
 
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"Nomad is about bringing people together in a beautiful space where from the moment they arrive all the way through, from service to food to wine, the experience as a whole is more than enjoyable – it’s memorable.”

 
 
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